Marathon

Marathon on Google

Marathon (Demotic Greek: Μαραθώνας, Marathónas; Attic/ Katharevousa: Μαραθών, Marathṓn) is a town in Greece, the site of the battle of Marathon in 490 BC, in which the heavily outnumbered Athenian army defeated the Persians. The tumulus or burial mound (Greek Τύμβος, tymbos, i.e. tomb), also called the "Soros," for the 192 Athenian dead that was erected near the battlefield remains a feature of the coastal plain. The Tymbos is now marked by a marble memorial stele and surrounded by a small park.

Marathon's name (Μαραθών) comes from the herb fennel, called marathon (μάραθον) or marathos (μάραθος) in Greek, so Marathon literally means "a place with fennels". The name of the athletic long-distance endurance race, the "marathon", comes from the legend of a Greek runner, who was sent from the town of Marathon to Athens to announce that the Persians had been miraculously defeated in the Battle of Marathon.
It is said that he ran the entire distance without stopping, but moments after proclaiming his message "Nenīkēkamen" ("We have won!") to the city, he collapsed from exhaustion. The account of the run near Marathon to Athens first appears in Plutarch's On the Glory of Athens in the 1st century AD, which quotes from Heraclides Ponticus' lost work, giving the runner's name as either Thersipus of Erchius or Eucles. Lucian of Samosata (2nd century AD) also gives the story but names the runner Philippides (not Pheidippides). The Greek historian Herodotus, the main source for the Greco-Persian Wars, mentions Pheidippides as the messenger who ran from Athens to Sparta asking for help. In some manuscripts of Herodotus the name of the runner between Athens and Sparta is given as Philippides.

5 Stars Hotels  
4 Stars Hotels  
3 Stars Hotels  
2 Stars Hotels  
1 Star Hotels  
Hotel - Apartments  
Mountain Resort  
Camping  
   
   

Freedom Paragliding

Golf

Hiking

Horse Riding

Kite Surfing

Local Guide

Mountain biking

One Day Cruise

Sea kayak

Scuba Diving

Yachting

Rafting

 

Design by